Some Minnesota workers, for one reason or another, are compelled to quit their jobs. In general, workers who quit their job are not eligible to receive unemployment compensation. However, there are some exceptions to this rule.

First, if a worker quit due to their employer’s actions and an average reasonable worker would do the same, or if a worker quit in order to accept a better job, then they may apply for unemployment compensation. Also, if a worker had to quit their job due to a serious injury or illness, or if they had to quit in order to take care of an immediate family member who suffered from a disability or an illness, then that worker may apply for unemployment compensation.

A worker may also apply for unemployment compensation if they worked part time and the wages in their base period were the result of full-time work that the worker, through no fault of their own, lost. A worker may also apply for unemployment compensation if they left their job within the first 30 days of working there because the job was unsuitable, or if the worker left their job because the job was unsuitable and they entered full-time reemployment assistance training.

In addition, if a worker received notice that they would be laid off in 30 days or less and they quit before that time period was up, then they may apply for unemployment compensation. Also, if a worker had to quit due to domestic abuse of the worker or their minor child, or if they had to quit because they lost their child care and could not find new child care despite his or her reasonable efforts to do so, then they may apply for unemployment compensation. Finally, if a worker had to quit because their spouse’s job location was moved, then they may apply for unemployment compensation.

As you can see, there are circumstances in which a worker can apply for unemployment compensation even if they quit their job. However, this post cannot promise any specific result with regards to a worker’s eligibility for unemployment compensation. If a worker believes they was wrongfully denied unemployment compensation or have other questions about employee rights, they can consult with an attorney. This will ensure that an individual is well informed of their rights and takes the best course of action.