Many Minnesota residents spend more time working in their office than they do at home, which is why they consider their place of employment their second home. Coworkers become akin to family members, and bosses and supervisors become elderly loved ones one looks up to and respects, for the most part. This is why it can be especially difficult to come to terms with illegalities taking place at work, either by a boss or a coworker.

As mentioned in last week’s post, illegalities do not always have to be intentional or active — it can even be illegal to remain silent about someone harassing or discriminating against a coworker because of their religious beliefs, race or sexual orientation. Employees also do not have to continue to work in a hostile environment, one categorized by discriminating remarks that have continued for some time and disrupt someone’s ability to continue working.

Employees have certain rights protected by both state and federal laws, and even though they may not be aware of them, they exist. Before signing a contract of employment, it might help to consult experienced attorneys, such as those at John A Klassen, PA, to understand the contract. Even when one has not vetted their contract before beginning to work, if an employee’s rights are being violated, they should consult someone with the knowledge and skill required to tell them their legal options.

Lawyers at our firm understand how difficult it is to speak up against a coworker or an employer and therefore, fight hard to advocate for our clients. By providing personalized attention and advice to those who need it, we have made a name for ourselves defending our clients. For more on our firm, visit our page.