John A. Klassen, PA Minnesota Employment Law Attorney
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Age Discrimination Archives

Claim of digital age discrimination breaking new ground

The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, or EEOC, has joined other federal agencies in investigating several high profile companies that advertise on Facebook. The allegation against these companies is that they used online recruiting ads that were intentionally shown only to men and to people under the age of 40.

Age discrimination has harmful effects on the state's economy

To follow up on a recent post, some experts say that the persistent problem of age discrimination in the workplace could adversely affect Minnesota's economy. At present, this state has about 140,000 unfilled positions, yet only about 70,000 people are actively looking for work. Should this trend continue, by 2024 Minnesota will have a shortfall of about 400,000 jobs, with 2.7 million people available to fill 3.1 million positions.

Study shows age discrimination prevalent across the spectrum

People above a certain age in Minnesota and across the nation will be aware of the possibility that their age could be a hindrance in their employment. Although age discrimination is illegal, it still happens frequently. While justifications could be provided by employers and others in a position of power in a workplace, if there is suspicion or proof that a person's age had a negative effect on their employment or attempts to get a job, it could be the basis to file a lawsuit to seek their employee rights.

What does age discrimination in the hiring process look like?

Job hunting can be challenging for anyone in Minneapolis. A person may have to send out dozens of resumes and go through several interviews before landing a job. However, some people may have a disadvantage in the hiring process -- their age. Sometimes, an employer will not hire a person based on that person's older age. This is age discrimination, and it is against the law.

Older workers should know their employment rights

If an employer is required to follow the tenants of federal or Minnesota state age discrimination law, then it may not discriminate against individuals who are at or above the age of 40. Discrimination based on age can happen at any point in the employment process, from the review of new hire applications to the termination of current employees. When it does occur, workers may be wrongfully harassed, discriminated against or terminated based on their inclusion in the class of older individuals.

Older workers face challenges when they look for employment

Although some individuals love the work that they do and enjoy putting in hours for their employers, many Minnesota residents work so that they can put food on their tables and care for the needs and wants of their families. Often workers set an age goal for when they can say goodbye to their careers and retire in order to spend more time with their loved ones and doing what they want to do. Today, however, many Americans of traditional retirement age are reentering the workforce and facing some challenges when it comes to finding work.

Exceptions exist to the applicability of the ADEA

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act is a federal law that prohibits how employers may treat their workers who are at least 40 years of age. The ADEA only applies to employers who have at least 20 workers, which means that it may not protect older workers who work at small businesses or for entities with smaller work staffs. In Minnesota, older workers may also find that the ADEA's protections do not reach them when certain exceptions are present.

Minnesota K9 officer alleges on-the-job discrimination

Law enforcement officers are important members of communities throughout Minnesota. They offer assistance, guidance and security to individuals who are in situations of peril, as well as protecting individuals from the threats of others. While some law enforcement officers are in the field with other human partners, others work closely with dogs who perform specific duties.

Baby boomers working past retirement age may face discrimination

Around 10,000 baby boomers reach retirement age daily across the country, so it makes sense that they account for a growing percentage of the workforce. Minnesotans aged 65 and older in the workforce increased about 63 percent from 2003, holding 4.4 percent of jobs that are covered by unemployment insurance in 2017. In the same period, the number of average hours they worked per week also went up, as did their average hourly wage.

U.S. Supreme Court rules on ADEA case

Age discrimination is a prohibited employment action under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. Employers in a variety of industries are not allowed to make adverse employment and hiring decisions about individuals based upon their ages. In Minnesota and other jurisdictions, cities and other local governments often fall under these rules, though prior to a recent United States Supreme Court decision the number of employees a municipality or group employed may have exempt it from the ADEA.

Defending the Civil Rights of Vulnerable People

When employers discriminate or allow harassment and retaliation to take place or continue, we are dedicated to holding them accountable for their unlawful actions.

John A. Klassen, PA
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